Medical School Interviews

Medical School Interviews
Why Do You Want to Be a Doctor?

Many premeds worry about the content of the medical school interview. The most important content to conquer is about you. You already know all about yourself but the key is figuring out how to present that to the interviewer.

Start your interview prep by answering this question:

“Why do you want to be a doctor?”

Simple, huh? Go ahead and try to answer it right now.

Harder than it seems, isn’t it?

This question will be asked in some form in every interview. You answered it in the AMCAS primary essay, but interviewers want to hear it again. It is the essential question, right?

Your goal is to answer the question clearly and concisely with no more than three talking points. Tying these three reasons to brief anecdotes will help the interviewer remember your reasons.

Medical School Interviews – The First Twelve Inches

To help you pull it all together on your interview day, etiquette experts have a simple rule to ensure you are looking your best. It’s the first 12 inches that matter most (head, hands, feet):


Hair clean and well-groomed
Be clean-shaven
Check nothing is stuck in your teeth


Groom the nails short and clean
No chipped nail polish


Polish the shoes
Guys – be sure your socks match
Ladies – no runs in panty hose or stockings
Medical School Interviews – Hair and Accessories

The medical school interview season is not the time to experiment with that mohawk you always wanted. Keep the hair clean and simple. Men with long hair do not need to cut it all off, just keep it clean and out of your face. The same rules apply to women.

As for jewelry, earrings in men are always a point of controversy. If your earring is an important part of who you are, leave it in. But if it’s just a piece of jewelry, I would take it out. Body piercings that show (nose ring, tongue ring, eyebrow ring, etc) fall under the same general guidelines as earrings. Wear it if it is a huge part of who you are. Lose it for a day if it isn’t.

MDadmit provides medical school admissions consulting services to anyone considering applying to medical school whether you are a freshman in college

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